2016 Scixel’s Overview

Finally we’ve found some time to produce our 2016 demoreel. It’s been a great year. We’ve worked with a lot of new people in Spain and abroad. Lots of amazing projects both artistically and scientifically. These are some of them:

This is a way of both showing off about the people we’ve worked with and expressing some gratitude. It is difficult not to feel lucky.

On charging your phone with your jumper

Imagine having your your battery charger printed on your clothes or on the screen of your cellphone… this is what Organic Nanostructured Photovoltaics group, at ICFO is proposing. The use of organic electronics allows the production of  flexible cells which happen to be highly inefficient. By layering nanoparticles in a clever way, they’ve been able to increase the performance of these devices, thus solving the problem.

With the help of Dr. Silvia Colodrero, we created this picture which made it to the cover of Advanced Functional Materials.

News from the other side

While preparing the 2016 demoreel, I’ve just found two covers I did during last year I was totally unaware of… This seems to be alive beyond my control.

Light and Death

At Cristina Flors’s research group they have been able to study bacterial death in real time. Bacterial death is induced through the combination of light and photosensitizers. This way it is possible inspect the pathway of photodynamic damage at the single-cell level.

Their work has been awarded with the cover of February’s issue of the Journal of Biophotonics.

Scixel goes to China

Dr. Lanza’s research activity is somewhat beyond understanding. At least beyond our understanding. Here is a good example: his new book on Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy, where he, together with leading researchers, provides a global perspective on the subject and covers novel strategies, configurations and setups where new information will be obtained with the help of CAFM.

On fuelling biological machines

If I got this right, Dr. Ivan Lopez Montero et al, had fuelled ATPases by placing them in a lipid membrane over a modified metallic surface. Using this surface as an electrode, now they can make ATPase work creating ATP molecules wherever they are needed… Yes, I’m not kidding.

This is the kind of research that make you fantasize about the near future. Not surprise that their work made the cover of Angewandte Chemie International Edition

Pushing AFM capabilities to the limit

AFM was invented 35 years ago. Then, its capabilities were already impressive. But 35 years later, researchers have boosted its sensitivity and amazingly spread its spectrum of the quantities measured. Ricardo Garcia’s group, ForceTool, has participated in this process in a prominent position. In this last work , they’ve pushed these boundaries yet a little further.

This work is the result of the collaboration of Pataata and Scixel. We are expecting it to be just the first of many.